39th Annual J.P. Morgan
HEALTH CARE CONFERENCE
January 11 – 14, 2021 | Virtual

The 39th Annual Health Care Conference will take place virtually on January 11-14, 2021. In lieu of an in-person conference, we will provide virtual access to corporate presentations. All sessions will be through video webcasts and will take place in Eastern Time (ET).

In 2020 we celebrated 38 years of hosting the largest and most informative health care investment symposium in the industry which connects global industry leaders, emerging fast-growth companies, innovative technology creators and members of the investment community. In 2021, we expect more than 400 companies, both public and private, to deliver presentations to more than 8,000 participants.

Keynotes

Jamie Dimon
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
JPMorgan Chase & Co.
Full Bio
Andy Slavitt
Former Acting Administrator of CMS, General Partner of Town Hall Ventures and Board Chair of United States of Care
Full Bio
Angela Hwang
Group President
Pfizer Biopharmaceuticals Group
Full Bio
Brian S. Tyler
Chief Executive Officer
McKesson Corporation
Full Bio
Karen S. Lynch
Executive Vice President, CVS Health
President, Aetna
Full Bio
Condoleezza Rice
Former U.S. Secretary of State
Full Bio

Insights

How COVID-19 Accelerated Telehealth Services

Lisa Gill, Senior Analyst for Health Care Technology and Distribution, explains why telehealth will continue to gain more momentum in a post-COVID world.

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How COVID-19 Accelerated Telehealth Services

Lisa Gill, Senior Analyst for Health Care Technology and Distribution, explains why telehealth will continue to gain more momentum in a post-COVID world.

Lisa Gill: As we think of some of the trends that happened in 2020 due to the pandemic, we think the biggest that will stay in 2021 will be telehealth. You had about 1 in 4 people who knew that they had a telehealth benefit. Today we think that number is closer to 80% of people know they have a telehealth benefit.

As you look as people that use telehealth for the first time during the pandemic, they're most likely to use it two to three times again. Where a lot of things that you never thought of before can move virtually. There's about a third of all ambulatory care visits that could be done telephonically. It's safest for a patient, especially those with Comorbidities, to be in the home.

But there's things like a vaccine that needs to be administered. There are things like a broken arm that needs to be set or x-rays that need to be done. And so as we think about this going forward, there's always going to be that need for in-person touch as we think about the vaccine and actually administering the vaccine. We think about people that are on multiple medications and the need to have that relationship with their pharmacist, to come in and to see that healthcare provider.

So we think that competition is going to continue to be there. I think that competition with strong companies like Amazon make these companies smarter and make them more nimble, make them realize that they have to continue to compete. In order to continue to compete, they have to continue to evolve and change over time. And like I said, we continue to see that across the supply chain. You're going to continue to see the growth of telehealth and the adoption of telehealth.

Ramping Up COVID-19 Vaccine Production

Senior Analyst for Biotechnology Corey Kasimov explains the precedent set by the COVID-19 vaccine production timeline and its future impact on the market.

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Ramping Up COVID-19 Vaccine Production

Senior Analyst for Biotechnology Corey Kasimov explains the precedent set by the COVID-19 vaccine production timeline and its future impact on the market.

Cory Kasimov: Innovation's the life blood of the biotechnology sector. And that's really coming to the forefront during this particular pandemic. So the biotechnology sector has essentially done in 9 or 10 months what it would typically take 10+ years to do. When this process began back in the spring and vaccines first moved in to human volunteers, there was a lot of debate on, first and foremost, whether they would even be effective enough to meet regulatory thresholds that were put in place for vaccine efficacy. So the fact that we have these initial vaccines demonstrating a vaccine efficacy rate over placebo on the order of 95% is pretty remarkable.

Our best guess for a mass vaccination campaign is probably the summer of 2021. This depends on a number of factors. How many vaccines actually work? When can these vaccines be approved? And then how quickly can these companies scale up production and supply of these individual vaccines to get them out into the marketplace?

From the standpoint of the market as a whole, the market has seen profound impact from the discovery of vaccines. I think the biggest impact's probably been felt already. From a company-specific point of view when you think about these pseudo-COVID pure plays, I would imagine that these are going to remain highly volatile securities.

We just have concerns as more and more vaccines likely come to the market that the valuations might not be sustainable for the long term. However, this is still very validating for these companies that have essentially come to the rescue to the world designing these incredible products. It speaks volumes to the long-term outlook and where biotechnology can go in the future.

FAQs

The J.P. Morgan Health Care Conference is for clients of the firm, by invitation only. Please reach out to your J.P. Morgan representative to inquire about an invitation.

Some company presentations will be available on their individual websites.

The agenda is made available only to confirmed attendees.

Yes; there are a limited number of press passes for the event.

Unless otherwise specified, conference webinars are on-the-record and open to registered members of the press.

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