Practical and Poetic

The evolving JPMorgan Chase Art Collection
The JPMorgan Chase Art Collection was the first of its kind when it was founded in 1959 by David Rockefeller, then president of Chase Manhattan Bank. Rockefeller is now considered the father of modern corporate art collecting for his then-radical approach to art in the workplace.

Today, his celebrated vision is being carried forward as the Collection continues to evolve largely as it began—through the acquisition of works by living artists.

 

Though quite encyclopedic across styles, periods and genres, the Collection is renowned for its focus on contemporary art, and continues to expand not only through new acquisitions, but also by commissions and other programs that support the work of living artists.  

“The Collection is not just a static thing that hangs on the wall,” explains Director and Chief Curator Lisa K. Erf. “It’s a visual and intellectual experience.” 

Commissioning new work
To continue bringing that experience into the workplace, Ms. Erf commissions new works such as the monumental acrylic on canvas British artist Jason Brooks created for a recently renovated J.P. Morgan building in London’s financial district.

Mr. Brooks created an abstract image with sculptural qualities to complement the atrium of glass and stone in which it hangs.

“The piece has dual purpose,” explains Ms. Erf. “You can see it from afar and think it’s one thing, but when you get up close you realize it’s something else...that kind of surprise and wow factor and excitement is something we want our guests to feel as they walk into the building.” 

Supporting the arc of a career
In addition to acquiring and commissioning works for J.P. Morgan offices, Ms. Erf makes loans from the Collection to museums for exhibition purposes. A few years ago, she discovered the work of a young abstract painter in California named Kim Fisher, and acquired four of her works to “give a local flair to our L.A. client center,” recounts Ms. Erf. “A year later, we acquired another larger piece—an out-of-focus yellow beach chair on a black background that is very evocative of light and space.”

This year, Ms. Erf was able to loan one of Ms. Fisher’s artworks to the Hammer Museum’s “Made in L.A.,” an important show of up-and-coming artists. “To be able to see the arc of her career rise to the point that she’s now being sought after by museums is such a privilege, and we’re so happy for Kim,” says Ms. Erf about this vital way that the Collection evolves by supporting emerging young artists.

Completing an artist’s vision
Bjørn Sterri, a contemporary Norwegian photographer whose work is part of the Collection, won the Codice MIA 2013 prize in Milan, where Ms. Erf was serving as a judge and panelist. “I was just enthralled with his photographs,” she explains, “and I knew that even if he didn’t win the award, we would be buying some of his work. It was that phenomenal. He did win the award, and we did end up acquiring work for our Collection.”

Ms. Erf purchased six photographs that are part of a series of black-and-white portraits that Mr. Sterri has taken of his family every week over many years. As part of the award, Mr. Sterri was able to exhibit his work at a stand at this year’s MIA fair. To enable his series to be showcased the way he originally envisioned—a complex arrangement from Oslo to Milan—Ms. Erf lent a selection of his work from the Collection on his behalf.

“It’s really a privilege for us to be associated with someone who is so talented and still relatively undiscovered, and we look forward to being right alongside Bjørn in the ride that he will experience. His work is so phenomenal, and it’s starting to happen already,” says Ms. Erf.

As the Collection continues to evolve by supporting up-and-coming artists—through acquisitions, commissions, loans and other programs—the focus Rockefeller first established in 1959 has remained the same: provide practical and poetic inspiration to nourish the imagination.

To learn more about the JPMorgan Chase Art Collection or to discuss your own interest in art and collecting, please contact us, and a J.P. Morgan representative will be in touch with you.

Related Topic: Detail adds up

Jason Brooks discusses his newly commissioned work for the JPMorgan Chase Art Collection



    “The Collection is not just a static thing that hangs on the wall,” explains Director and Chief Curator Lisa K. Erf. “It’s a visual and intellectual experience.” 

     Commissioning new work

     To continue bringing that experience into the workplace, Ms. Erf commissions new works such as the monumental acrylic on canvas British artist Jason Brooks created for a recently renovated J.P. Morgan building in London’s financial district.

     Mr. Brooks created an abstract image with sculptural qualities to complement the atrium of glass and stone in which it hangs.

     “The piece has dual purpose,” explains Ms. Erf. “You can see it from afar and think it’s one thing, but when you get up close you realize it’s something else...that kind of surprise and wow factor and excitement is something we want our guests to feel as they walk into the building.” 

     Supporting the arc of a career

     In addition to acquiring and commissioning works for J.P. Morgan offices, Ms. Erf makes loans from the Collection to museums for exhibition purposes. A few years ago, she discovered the work of a young abstract painter in California named Kim Fisher, and acquired four of her works to “give a local flair to our L.A. client center,” recounts Ms. Erf. “A year later, we acquired another larger piece—an out-of-focus yellow beach chair on a black background that is very evocative of light and space.”  

Though quite encyclopedic across styles, periods and genres, the Collection is renowned for its focus on contemporary art, and continues to expand not only through new acquisitions, but also by commissions and other programs that support the work of living artists. 

    “The Collection is not just a static thing that hangs on the wall,” explains Director and Chief Curator Lisa K. Erf. “It’s a visual and intellectual experience.” 

     Commissioning new work

     To continue bringing that experience into the workplace, Ms. Erf commissions new works such as the monumental acrylic on canvas British artist Jason Brooks created for a recently renovated J.P. Morgan building in London’s financial district.

     Mr. Brooks created an abstract image with sculptural qualities to complement the atrium of glass and stone in which it hangs.

     “The piece has dual purpose,” explains Ms. Erf. “You can see it from afar and think it’s one thing, but when you get up close you realize it’s something else...that kind of surprise and wow factor and excitement is something we want our guests to feel as they walk into the building.” 

     Supporting the arc of a career

     In addition to acquiring and commissioning works for J.P. Morgan offices, Ms. Erf makes loans from the Collection to museums for exhibition purposes. A few years ago, she discovered the work of a young abstract painter in California named Kim Fisher, and acquired four of her works to “give a local flair to our L.A. client center,” recounts Ms. Erf. “A year later, we acquired another larger piece—an out-of-focus yellow beach chair on a black background that is very evocative of light and space.”  

     This year, Ms. Erf was able to loan one of Ms. Fisher’s artworks to the Hammer Museum’s “Made in L.A.,” an important show of up-and-coming artists. “To be able to see the arc of her career rise to the point that she’s now being sought after by museums is such a privilege, and we’re so happy for Kim,” says Ms. Erf about this vital way that the Collection evolves by supporting emerging young artists.

     Completing an artist’s vision

     Bjørn Sterri, a contemporary Norwegian photographer whose work is part of the Collection, won the Codice MIA 2013 prize in Milan, where Ms. Erf was serving as a judge and panelist. “I was just enthralled with his photographs,” she explains, “and I knew that even if he didn’t win the award, we would be buying some of his work. It was that phenomenal. He did win the award, and we did end up acquiring work for our Collection.”

     Ms. Erf purchased six photographs that are part of a series of black-and-white portraits that Mr. Sterri has taken of his family every week over many years. As part of the award, Mr. Sterri was able to exhibit his work at a stand at this year’s MIA fair. To enable his series to be showcased the way he originally envisioned—a complex arrangement from Oslo to Milan—Ms. Erf lent a selection of his work from the Collection on his behalf.

     “It’s really a privilege for us to be associated with someone who is so talented and still relatively undiscovered, and we look forward to being right alongside Bjørn in the ride that he will experience. His work is so phenomenal, and it’s starting to happen already,” says Ms. Erf.

     As the Collection continues to evolve by supporting up-and-coming artists—through acquisitions, commissions, loans and other programs—the focus Rockefeller first established in 1959 has remained the same: provide practical and poetic inspiration to nourish the imagination.


     To learn more about the JPMorgan Chase Art Collection or to discuss your own interest in art and collecting, please contact us, and a J.P. Morgan representative will be in touch with you.

    © 2014 JPMorgan Chase & Co. All rights reserved.Though quite encyclopedic across styles, periods and genres, the Collection is renowned for its focus on contemporary art, and continues to expand not only through new acquisitions, but also by commissions and other programs that support the work of living artists. 

    “The Collection is not just a static thing that hangs on the wall,” explains Director and Chief Curator Lisa K. Erf. “It’s a visual and intellectual experience.” 

     Commissioning new work

     To continue bringing that experience into the workplace, Ms. Erf commissions new works such as the monumental acrylic on canvas British artist Jason Brooks created for a recently renovated J.P. Morgan building in London’s financial district.

     Mr. Brooks created an abstract image with sculptural qualities to complement the atrium of glass and stone in which it hangs.

     “The piece has dual purpose,” explains Ms. Erf. “You can see it from afar and think it’s one thing, but when you get up close you realize it’s something else...that kind of surprise and wow factor and excitement is something we want our guests to feel as they walk into the building.” 

     Supporting the arc of a career

     In addition to acquiring and commissioning works for J.P. Morgan offices, Ms. Erf makes loans from the Collection to museums for exhibition purposes. A few years ago, she discovered the work of a young abstract painter in California named Kim Fisher, and acquired four of her works to “give a local flair to our L.A. client center,” recounts Ms. Erf. “A year later, we acquired another larger piece—an out-of-focus yellow beach chair on a black background that is very evocative of light and space.”  

     This year, Ms. Erf was able to loan one of Ms. Fisher’s artworks to the Hammer Museum’s “Made in L.A.,” an important show of up-and-coming artists. “To be able to see the arc of her career rise to the point that she’s now being sought after by museums is such a privilege, and we’re so happy for Kim,” says Ms. Erf about this vital way that the Collection evolves by supporting emerging young artists.

     Completing an artist’s vision

     Bjørn Sterri, a contemporary Norwegian photographer whose work is part of the Collection, won the Codice MIA 2013 prize in Milan, where Ms. Erf was serving as a judge and panelist. “I was just enthralled with his photographs,” she explains, “and I knew that even if he didn’t win the award, we would be buying some of his work. It was that phenomenal. He did win the award, and we did end up acquiring work for our Collection.”

     Ms. Erf purchased six photographs that are part of a series of black-and-white portraits that Mr. Sterri has taken of his family every week over many years. As part of the award, Mr. Sterri was able to exhibit his work at a stand at this year’s MIA fair. To enable his series to be showcased the way he originally envisioned—a complex arrangement from Oslo to Milan—Ms. Erf lent a selection of his work from the Collection on his behalf.

     “It’s really a privilege for us to be associated with someone who is so talented and still relatively undiscovered, and we look forward to being right alongside Bjørn in the ride that he will experience. His work is so phenomenal, and it’s starting to happen already,” says Ms. Erf.

     As the Collection continues to evolve by supporting up-and-coming artists—through acquisitions, commissions, loans and other programs—the focus Rockefeller first established in 1959 has remained the same: provide practical and poetic inspiration to nourish the imagination.


     To learn more about the JPMorgan Chase Art Collection or to discuss your own interest in art and collecting, please contact us, and a J.P. Morgan representative will be in touch with you.

    © 2014 JPMorgan Chase & Co. All rights reserved.Contact us to learn more about the opportunities we’re identifying to capitalize on these ideas.

 
 

Copyright © 2015 JPMorgan Chase & Co. All rights reserved.